Robbery

Under Utah Criminal Code Section 76-6-301, Robbery is a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. Robbery occurs when an offender:

  • knowingly or intentionally uses force or fear of immediate force;
  • against another in the course of committing a wrongful appropriation or theft under the following circumstances:
    • in the course of an attempt to commit theft or wrongful appropriation;
    • in the commission of theft or wrongful appropriation; or
    • in the immediate flight after the attempt or commission.

Elements of robbery include the following:

  • intentionally or unlawfully taking or attempting to take the personal property of another person;
  • while that personal property is either in the possession of the other person or in that person's immediate presence;
  • the taking is against the person's will;
  • taken by means of fear or force; or
  • with the intent to deprive the person temporarily or permanently of the person property.

Brown, Bradshaw & Moffat, LLP | Salt Lake City Criminal Defense Attorney

A robbery conviction can have very disastrous consequences on a person’s personal and professional life. When someone has been accused of committing robbery they potentially face both criminal and civil charges. Criminal convictions also show up on background checks which can make it difficult for offenders to find employment.

If you have been accused of committing a robbery in Salt Lake City, Utah or Surrounding area’s contact the lawyers of Brown, Bradshaw & Moffat, LLP at (801) 532-5297 for an initial consultation today.  Our lawyers have represented clients charged with both misdemeanor and felony offenses and can work with you towards reaching a positive resolution of your case.


Aggravated Robbery in Utah

Under Utah Criminal Code Section 76-6-302, aggravated robbery is a felony in the first degree, punishable by up to a life sentence in prison if convicted. Aggravated robbery requires the defendant to do the following during the course of the robbery:

  • use or threaten to use a dangerous weapon as defined in Section 76-6-601;
  • cause serious bodily injury upon another; or
  • take or attempt to take an operable motor vehicle from another.

In order for a robbery offense to be aggravated in Utah, an actual weapon does not have to be present. Under Utah law, the element of using or threatening to use a dangerous weapon can be satisfied by evidence that the person merely claimed to have such a weapon and threatened to use it. For example, if someone places their hand in their pocket and claims to have a gun this may be considered threatening to use a dangerous weapon although a gun may not have been used in the actual commission of this crime.


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Robbery Additional Resources

Section 76-6-301: Visit the website of Utah’s Legislature to view the laws that define robbery in Utah under the criminal code. Robbery is a second-degree felony. You may also search for other applicable criminal laws throughout the state on this page.

Offenses Against Property under Utah’s Criminal Code - Visit the website of the Utah State Legislature to learn more about offenses against property under Utah’s criminal code. The most common property crimes prosecuted in Utah include burglary, robbery, theft, retail theft. and fraud. Also, on this website, you can find information about Utah’s Identity Fraud Act and the Computer Crimes Act.

Utah Classification of Criminal Offenses- Visit the website of Utah Courts to see criminal penalties and classifications for felonies, infraction, and misdemeanors in the state.


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Salt Lake City Robbery Charges Attorney

If you are facing robbery or aggravated robbery charges in Salt Lake City, UT or surrounding area’s contact the criminal defense lawyers of Brown, Bradshaw & Moffat, LLP as soon as possible. , you need the assistance of criminal defense lawyers who understand the laws involved and how to best approach a case to limit the serious repercussions.

Contact the experienced criminal defense lawyers of Brown, Bradshaw & Moffat, LLP at (801) 532-5297 today for a free no obligation consultation.

This page was last updated on June 2, 2017